Biden claims Trump’s refusal to concede could cause spike in COVID-19 deaths

Democratic Party leaders and many in the mainstream media have been applying increased pressure on President Donald Trump to concede defeat in the 2020 election to former Vice President Joe Biden.

As for the Democratic nominee himself, Biden said on Monday that the president’s refusal to acknowledge him as the winner could result in increased deaths associated with COVID-19.

Biden pushes for access

Most news outlets have already called the election for Biden, though the Trump re-election team has been exploring its legal options in response to allegations of voter fraud.

As a result, Biden and his team have argued that the Trump administration is unfairly holding up access to sensitive data as part of the transition process ahead of Inauguration Day in January.

The prospective president-elect has complained about the possible ramifications of being shut out from traditional intelligence briefings — specifically as they relate to the coronavirus pandemic and the related distribution of an eventual vaccine.

Trump and his allies, however, have emphasized that the election has not yet been certified, leading many Democrats to conclude that their position constitutes a threat to democracy, national security, and public health.

At a recent event in Delaware, Biden portrayed the possible future in stark terms as he accused the president of putting lives at risk.

“Shut down the virus”

“More people may die if we don’t coordinate,” he said.

Among GOP leaders, just a few have labeled Biden as the president-elect and some have signaled support for allowing him to receive relevant briefings.

For his part, the Democratic nominee has signaled a stricter federal response to the pandemic than the Trump administration, insisting that he would “shut down the virus” while equivocating on the specific issue of pursuing another widespread economic and social lockdown.

At least one member of his coronavirus advisory team, however, has proposed exactly such a shutdown lasting as long as six weeks.

“Right now, we don’t have a standardized set so you’re hearing all these governors and mayors are scrambling to try to find what is the right answer for us, and it would surely help all of them, and that’s what I’m hearing from them, that we have a standardized set of recommendations and protocols,” said Dr. Michael Osterholm on Monday.

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