GOP pledges to investigate Hunter Biden’s art sales

Hunter Biden was in the news again last week after Elon Musk released documents showing how Twitter staff colluded with Democrats to suppress reporting on his laptop during the 2020 election.

Yet the laptop isn’t Biden’s only source of controversy, with critics pointing to his art sales as a possible ethics violation. 

Fox News reported that Biden was seen last week at New York City’s Georges Bergès Art Gallery. According to the network, his work can be purchased there for anywhere between $65,000 and $200,000.

Art professor calls prices “a campaign contribution”

Those prices have raised eyebrows among experts, including John Ploff, who teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Ploff scoffed at an inexperienced artist like Biden commanding six figure checks for his work, telling Politico, “That’s like a campaign contribution, right?”

Kentucky Republican Rep. James Comer is expected to become chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, and he agrees with Ploff’s assessment.

“The American people deserve transparency and accountability about the Biden family’s influence peddling,” Fox News quoted Comer as saying during a November 17 press conference.

“With the new Republican majority, Oversight Committee Republicans will continue pressing for answers to inform legislative solutions to prevent this abuse of power,” the conservative lawmaker insisted.

Former Obama ethics chief calls art sales “absolutely appalling”

What’s more, Fox News noted that it isn’t just Republicans who have taken notice. Walter Shaub served as ethics chief under former President Barack Obama, and he called out Biden’s art sales during an appearance last year on Law & Crime’s “Objections” podcast.

“There is simply no way an artist who has never even juried into a community center art fair is going to suddenly show up in New York selling art for half a million a pop,” Shaub said.

He added that money from inflated art price tags was “going to the president’s son for being the president’s son, not for being an artist, and I just think that’s absolutely appalling.”

“If he were a patriot — if he cared about this country — he would not want to tarnish his father’s reputation that way, Shaub continued

“Now, we can’t fault him for not being a patriot. We can’t fault him for not caring enough about his father’s legacy to avoid this,” Shaub acknowledged.

Still, Shaub insisted that “the White House crossed the line” last year after it defended a decision by the gallery selling Biden’s work to keep the identity of buyers a secret.