Swearing-in of House Republican narrows Pelosi’s margin to two votes

Rep. Julie Letlow (R-LA) was sworn in to her House seat Wednesday, leaving Democrats with only a two-vote margin to cushion their majority with several other vacancies to fill.

Letlow’s seating gives Democrats a 218-212 majority, which means that only two Democrats can vote against any given bill before it is in danger of failing to pass, if Republicans all vote against it. Ties do not count in the House.

Letlow’s husband Luke Letlow was elected in a special election but died of COVID in September before he could be sworn in.

The razor-thin margin could hold back some far-left bills that aren’t supported by the few moderate Democrats still left in the House.

More elections to come

Upcoming special elections could shift the balance of power yet again; of the three special elections that could be held in the next two months, Democrats are expected to win two of them. This would bring the margin back to the three votes it was when the 117th Congress started in January 2021, with 220 Democrats to 213 Republicans.

In November, another blue district special election will be held in Ohio to replace former Democratic Rep. Marcia Fudge, who was confirmed as Housing and Urban Development secretary.

The final vacant seat is in Florida due to the recent death of Alcee Hastings (D), and no one knows when Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) will decide to hold an election to fill that seat.

With such a thin margin, any death, resignation or appointment to his administration by President Joe Biden could shift power in a significant way.

About special elections

A look at recent congresses shows anywhere between seven and 17 special elections in the last five two-year House terms.

While Republicans have seemed to win a majority of these special elections, it was often a slim majority, which wouldn’t change the overall numbers much.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said she wasn’t worried about the impact of the margin on her agenda and that advancing it is “not going to be a problem.”

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) agreed in March, saying, “Frankly, we’re doing OK as Democrats as you look at this quarter.”

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11 Responses

  1. So— what happens if those special election seats go to Republicans? Piglosi would have to be replaced as speaker by Kevin McCarthy, because the republicans would be the majority. Get out the Republican votes, take those three seats!

  2. These seats need to be filled by Republicans in order to help balance the power in Congress. Hopefully it would rid the House of Pelosi.
    Hoping also it would stop court packing and gun grabbing leftists.

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  4. I hope her old drunk butt gets kicked out. She is a pos. She had better leave and start praying to the lord for the awful things she has done. I am sure that god is not a democrat, republican or independent or just takes the Catholics either.q

  5. NANCY PELOSI HAS MADE HER CAREER SCREWING THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA AND SUCKING UP TO THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF RED CHINA. ONE OF THE MOST CORRUPT POLITICANS IN AMERICA. THIS CREEP HAS TO BE STOPPED !

  6. There are many not so liberal dems that are not very happy with much of what Biden has done so far. If the conservatives really get together, they might get control of the house this year and not have to wait till 2022. For that to happen, we must fix our election fraud problem now.

  7. When I was young you had two chances to vote. An absentee ballot and vote in person on election day. There was no EARLY voting. It is just nother way for the Democrats to push their way into office.

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