‘We’re supposed to trust him?’: Jim Jordan shreds Adam Schiff’s credibility

Speaking to reporters Wednesday during a break in the Senate impeachment trial, it took Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) less than a minute to shred impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA)’s credibility.

“We’re supposed to believe Adam Schiff today and everything he’s saying?” Jordan asked, before listing no less than seven things Schiff has gotten factually wrong during impeachment proceedings.

Watch:

Chronicling Schiff’s lies

The Republican congressman told reporters that Schiff’s many lies, exaggerations, and mischaracterizations have been apparent to the American people and asked why anyone should believe Schiff’s two-plus hours of pontificating on the Senate floor when he’s been so wrong in the past.

“This is the guy who said, ‘We have more than circumstantial evidence that there was coordination between Trump and Russia, and Russia influenced the election.’ That turned out to be false. Adam Schiff said that the Nunes memo was false. Michael Horowitz told us no it wasn’t; it was exactly right,” Jordan explained.

“Adam Schiff said you can trust the FISA court,” Jordan went on. “Michael Horowitz told us last month that no, you can’t; they lied to the FISA court 17 times. Adam Schiff told us we look forward to hearing from the whistleblower. Adam Schiff said we’ve had no contact with the whistleblower.”

“Then just yesterday, the story where he misrepresents to all of you to Chairman [Jerry] Nadler and most importantly to the White House counsel that Mr. Z is Mr. Zelensky, when in fact it was Mr. Zlochevsky,” Jordan concluded, adding, “But today we’re supposed to believe him? He just talked for two hours and 15 minutes, and we’re supposed to believe everything he said today, in spite of that history, where seven important things he had exactly wrong?…That’s the kind of game that they’re playing here, and, again, I think that the American people see through it all.”

Dems employ inflammatory rhetoric

Jordan is among several House Republicans who have joined President Donald Trump’s legal team for the impeachment trial. Democrats have spent the last three days of the trial presenting their impeachment case to senators.

Their rhetoric has been so overblown and inflammatory that it drew a rare rebuke from Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, which was addressed to both sides but was prompted by Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), who accused Republicans of treason for refusing to call witnesses like former National Security Adviser John Bolton. “Any senator who votes against Ambassador Bolton’s testimony or any relevant testimony shows that he or she wants to be part of the cover-up,” Nadler said after midnight on Tuesday, adding that their votes were “treacherous” and a “vote against the United States.”

Nadler offends moderate Republicans

His comments prompted Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) to send Roberts a note in protest. Another moderate Republican, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), said, “As one who is listening attentively and working hard to get to a fair process, I was offended.”

If Democrats are seeking to gain ground with moderate Republicans, who they hope might vote against their party to support calling witnesses later in the trial, insulting them might not be the best tactic. Nadler’s stunt just might have killed any hope they have of peeling off Collins, Murkowski, and other moderates to get witness testimony or other concessions as the trial goes on.

It almost seems like Democrats know how this whole thing is going to end. They may just be looking for ammunition to smear moderate Republicans with their constituencies later in hopes of maybe taking back the majority in the Senate in 2020 and killing a re-elected Trump’s chances of nominating more conservative judges in his second term.

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