New York City sees 205% rise in shootings after disbanding ‘anti-crime’ unit

Fewer police equals more crime, and while this is a self-evident truth for most Americans, some recently-released numbers are reinforcing that fact.

The New York Post reports that since New York City eliminated its plainclothes “anti-crime” unit, there has been more than a 200% rise in the number of shootings as compared to this time last year.

Statistics don’t lie

The Post assembled a series of statistics comparing the second half of June 2020 to the same period last year.

The outlet found that the number of gunfire events has increased 205%, from 38 incidents by this time in 2019 to 116 in 2020. Similarly, it found a 238% increase in gunshot injuries, from 47 in 2019 to 157 in 2020.

According to the Post, “With a total of 205 shootings during the month, it was the bloodiest June in 24 years — going back to 1996, when the NYPD logged 236 incidents.”

The reason for this dramatic change is not difficult to deduce.

Cause and effect

Since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis in late May, voices from the left and even some on the right have been calling for far-reaching police reform, with liberal activists in many American cities going so far as to demand that law enforcement agencies be defunded altogether.

Accordingly, New York City decided in June to eliminate its plainclothes “anti-crime” unit, as Forbes noted. The Washington Examiner reports that the unit was an offshoot of the NYPD’s prior Street Crimes Unit, which began in 1971 and was itself disbanded in 2002 following the death of Amadou Diallo. A federal investigation that followed that incident found that the unit was engaging in profiling of “non-white people,” the Examiner added.

Apparently, local leaders in the Big Apple were convinced that some kind of racial injustice would result from keeping its plainclothes unit active — despite it being on the forefront of curbing dangerous street crimes across the city. It does not strain credulity to think that their decision to cut the unit has contributed to the documented rise in gun violence seen in recent weeks.

Abandoning the fight

Hazel Thomas, whose son was fatally shot at a Brooklyn house party last month, told the Post that it is as if city officials have given “the streets back to the criminals,” the Post noted.

“They shouldn’t have disbanded it,” she said, referring to the plainclothes unit. “Whatever the problem they have, address it. But don’t disband the unit. Many lives would have been saved. Not just my son.”

The unfortunate truth is that as more of these so-called police reforms are implemented in jurisdictions across the country, the more discouraging the crime statistics are almost certain to become.

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