Pelosi attends ceremony memorializing US coronavirus deaths

As a way to memorialize Americans who have died from the coronavirus pandemic, Maryland-based artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg planted over 220,000 white flags in Washington, D.C.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) attended the display’s dedication on Monday and spoke about how “incomprehensible” the death toll was, The Hill reported.

“Incomprehensible”

It’s difficult not to see Pelosi’s presence at the event as exploiting tragedy for political purposes.

After all, the House speaker has shown little concern for those suffering from COVID lockdowns, as she has completely refused to compromise with Republicans on a coronavirus relief bill. She also didn’t seem too concerned for the American people when she decided to get her own hair done, while everyone else was barred from doing so.

“It’s almost incomprehensible that here in America this would happen,” the Democratic congresswoman said at the ceremony.

Pelosi continued, “But thank you for giving us this optic, this visual manifestation of it, not only the lives [lost] — how horrible all these are, but the families, the families, the communities, that have lost maybe 1,000 health care providers.”

“Health care providers, they risk their lives to save lives and now here they are, here they are in this display,” the House speaker went on to note.

Democrat failures

The Democratic Party and the media have taken every available opportunity to use the coronavirus pandemic as a weapon against President Donald Trump, failing to recognize or acknowledge Democratic leaders’ own failures.

In August, the Department of Justice announced that it would investigate orders issued by Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and others who required nursing facilities to accept people who were infected, leading to thousands of unnecessary deaths of the elderly, Fox News reported.

“Today the Justice Department requested COVID-19 data from the governors of states that issued orders which may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents,” read a statement from the DOJ.

“New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Michigan required nursing homes to admit COVID-19 patients to their vulnerable populations, often without adequate testing,” it continued.

Two of those states — New Jersey and New York — have the highest rates of coronavirus-related deaths in the country.

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