Texas social worker charged with 134 counts of voter fraud

Is election fraud a reality here in America or is it, as Big Tech and the Democrat-aligned mainstream media try to convince us, “misinformation”? You be the judge.

Attorney General of Texas Ken Paxton announced on Friday that his office has charged a social worker with no less than 134 felony counts of election fraud, KTVT reported.

What did she do?

The woman charged, Kelly Reagan Brunner, is a social worker at the Mexia State Supported Living Center, which according to the statement released by Paxton, “serve[s] people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Brunner stands accused of submitting voter registration applications for 67 of the resident in the facility without their consent and without the signature. She did so while pretending to be their agent.

The Texas attorney general explained that, “Under Texas law, only a parent, spouse or child who is a qualified voter of the county may act as an agent in registering a person to vote, after being appointed to do so by that person.”

Of course, Brunner was none of those things. And, not only that, but a good portion of those 67 residents, according to Paxton, “have been declared totally mentally incapacitated by a court, thereby making them ineligible to vote in Texas.”

What now?

If Brunner is convicted on those 134 felony counts, she could face up to ten years in prison.

Republican Greg Abbott, the governor of Texas, posted a statement about the situation on Twitter.

“Election fraud is real,” the governor said. “In Texas, we investigate and prosecute it. Today a Limestone County social worker was charged with 134 felony counts involving election fraud. All states must take election fraud seriously to ensure confidence in elections.”

It’s true

In Texas, they certainly do seem to work extremely diligently against election fraud, as Abbott said.

Back in September, Attorney General Paxton announced another arrest of several individuals alleged to have been involved in a ballot harvesting scheme for the state’s 2018 Democratic primary.

As a big cloud of doubt hangs over the 2020 presidential election, the country could certainly use more states as willing to fight as hard against fraud as Texas.

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