Congressional Democrats push to lower voting age

In what critics see as a cynical power grab, a group of Democrats moved last week to try and lower the voting age. 

According to the Daily Caller, New York Rep. Grace Meng joined with 12 other Democrats including fellow New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in introducing a joint resolution that would allow 16-year-olds to cast a ballot.

Voting age last lowered in 1971

It provides that “the right of citizens of the United States, who are sixteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.”

Lowering the national voting age would require passing a constitutional amendment, similar to the 26th Amendment which lowered the age to 18 when it was ratified in 1971.

The Daily Caller noted that the push by Democrats to lower the voting age is not new, as then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi championed the idea back in 2019.

“I myself, personally, I’m not speaking for my caucus, I myself have always been for lowering the voting age to 16,” Pelosi was quoted as telling the website.

“I think it’s really important to capture kids when they’re in high school, when they’re interested in all of this when they’re learning about government to be able to vote,” she continued.

That same year, far-left Massachusetts Democratic Rep. Ayanna Pressley introduced the “For The People Act,” which also sought to lower the voting age.

Critics deride proposal

Those efforts have been derided by opponents, with former CEO and conservative commentator Keith Ainsworth saying that Democrats “will do anything to keep and expand their power.”

Meanwhile, Arizona Republican political activist mocked Democrats for attempting to lower the voting age while “the working class” struggles to purchase basic necessities.

The Daily Caller noted that states and localities could unilaterally lower their voting age, a prospect that Rockville, Maryland is considering.

The idea was proposed last fall by a commission assembled to review the city’s charter. It argued that allowing those aged 16 to vote could have a “trickle-up effect” and encourage older residents to vote more often.