Rep. Jason Smith calls out senators who voted for Omnibus, wants them voted out

Rep. Jason Smith (R-MO), the ranking member of the House Budget Committee, stated on Friday’s episode of Varney & Co. on Fox Business Network that “a lot of those senators” who voted for the omnibus spending bill should be removed from office.

According to a report by Breitbart News, Smith also bemoaned the fact that the two senators who drafted the omnibus bill, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Senate Appropriations Committee Vice Chairman.

Host Lauren Simonetti asked, “Congressman, but how do you change the mentality in Washington among Democrats, but Republicans too, that it’s okay, you can just keep spending and spending and spending?”

Smith responded, “You need to get rid of a lot of those senators that decided to continue to spend like this. What’s unfortunate is the people who crafted this huge spending bill, none of them will ever face a vote of the people again, because they’re retiring.

“Both the Democrat and Republican people — individuals who crafted this legislation behind closed doors will never be up for an election again. This is what’s wrong with Washington. This is what people can’t stand.”

GOP senators slammed McConnell and other Republican colleagues for supporting the omnibus bill that recently passed.

Sens. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and Mike Lee of Utah, both Republicans, criticized Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and his fellow Republicans on Sunday for backing the $1.7 trillion omnibus bill that Congress put to President Biden’s desk on Friday.

The Republican senators had claimed that delaying the passage of an omnibus bill until after the GOP took control of the House in January would have given them more leverage.

In an interview with radio talk show host John Catsimatidis on Sunday, Lee blasted the omnibus as “the ugliest spending bill on record,” taking aim at McConnell and the party’s Senate leadership.

“Our party leadership turned on Republican voters, turned on the Republican base, turned on most Republican senators,” Lee said on “The Cats Roundtable” on WABC 770 AM. “It has happened before, but this is one too many times. For me, this is the final straw.”

“As Republicans scratch their heads over their disappointing midterms, they ought to consider that voters don’t see much of a defining difference with Democrats,” he added.

The substantial spending plan was easily approved by the Senate on Thursday, with the assistance of 18 Republican senators who joined Democrats in voting for the measure, which will finance the federal government through the end of September. After passing through the House on Friday, the package is now being sent to Biden for his signature.

Those who supported the omnibus argued it was a method to guarantee higher defense expenditure for the next year. The measure increased defense expenditure by 9.7 percent to $858 billion from the previous year, while non-defense spending climbed at a slower rate than inflation.

Johnson, who joined Catsimatidis on Sunday, chastised his fellow Republican senators for applauding the rise in defense spending in the omnibus bill.