Supreme Court ends bid to defend Trump’s ‘public charge’ rule

The Supreme Court has once again declined to consider a Republican lawsuit defending the Trump administration’s “public charge” rule that sought to keep immigrants who live off welfare from getting green cards.

The court dismissed a challenge Monday from 14 Republican states who said Trump’s policy would states millions of dollars a year.

Supreme Court dismisses immigration challenge

The court also dismissed a different Republican challenge concerning the “public charge” rule last year.

Trump introduced the “public charge” rule in 2019, among other “America First” reforms to curb legal and illegal immigration after decades of high rates that have reshaped the country’s political, cultural, and economic landscape.

Biden has aggressively unwound his predecessor’s strict immigration agenda, however, while bending over backwards to prioritize foreign nationals over American citizens with deep roots in the country.

The Biden administration quickly moved to scrap Trump’s rule before introducing Biden’s “fair and humane” version, which narrows the definition of “public charge” to exclude immigrants who depend on any non-cash form of public welfare, such as housing assistance or food stamps.

Biden plugs “reform”

The administration touted the new rule, which took effect in December, as “consistent with America’s bedrock values,” which apparently include open borders.

“We will not penalize individuals for choosing to access the health benefits and other supplemental government services available to them,” Biden’s Department of Homeland Security secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said previously.

Biden and his staff have made it clear they intend to drive immigration “reform” through the newly divided Congress in order to, as they put it, prevent the economy from tipping over.

Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo expressed the globalist, America Last mentality of the Biden regime when she said America is running up a deficit of “a million immigrants a year.”

America Last

Obviously, all of those immigrants will require housing, jobs, healthcare, and education for their kids, often at public expense. That doesn’t even account for the untold number of illegal immigrants who are settling in the U.S. at record rates, thanks to Biden’s policies.

The crisis could get worse if the Supreme Court declines to strike down Biden’s efforts to end Trump’s Title 42 border policy, which officials estimate is holding back a flood of 14,000 immigrants per day.

At this rate, it’s hard to say what will be left for future Americans to inherit — other than a mountain of debt.

However, Republicans aren’t giving up, with Texas’ attorney general Ken Paxton filing a fresh lawsuit against Biden’s “public charge” rule last week.