Kevin McCarthy still going despite 10 failed votes to become House speaker

Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) says he’ll continue his battle to become House speaker despite 10 rounds of voting that have left him short on votes.

McCarthy shared his latest comments on the issue Thursday night from Statuary Hall.

The comments

“This is a new thought we’re going to have to have. We have a five-seat majority,” he said. “So, it’s not one side is going to get more than another. It’s the entire conference that’s going to have to learn how to work together.”

“So it’s better that we go through this process right now, so we can achieve the things we want to achieve for the American public — what our commitment was,” he added.

“So if this takes a little longer and it doesn’t meet your deadline, that’s okay. It’s not how you start, it’s how you finish. If we finish well, we’ll be very successful,” McCarthy concluded.

The holdouts

“One of the holdouts, Rep. Ralph Norman of South Carolina suggested he could be convinced to swap his vote from ‘no’ to ‘yes’ if he likes the deal. Norman has been pushing for term limits for lawmakers and a balanced budget, as well as a commitment to use the upcoming debt ceiling debates to cut spending,” Zero Hedge reported.

“That said, McCarthy could still fall short – as Reps. such as Matt Gaetz (FL) and Lauren Boebert (CO) appear to be in the ‘Never Kevin’ camp,” it added.

“McCarthy ally Brian Fitzpatrick, co-chair of the Problem Solvers Caucus, suggested that negotiations could extend through the weekend,” the report noted.

Despite the controversies, McCarthy remains the most likely nominee to obtain the speakership, with no other GOP candidate nearing a majority.

Democrats have remained firm behind their leader Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), suggesting they have no interest in backing a GOP leader.

Some have suggested a deal or “coalition” government with Republicans, but the rumors have not led to any real action so far.

The battle may continue for some time, with most Americans simply angry at the government for ongoing inaction.